Giving

Disease Prevention and Control

Our scientific mission is built on two goals: finding better cures and preventing disease. We are committed to making discoveries that result in treatments that will quickly benefit people with diabetes, cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. As we race to provide real solutions for people confronting disease today, we are searching for ways to eliminate and prevent these ailments in the future.

Milestones and Possibilities

  • Our bodies are more than just our own cells. The ecosystem of tiny organisms that flourish in our guts — called the microbiome — significantly affects our health in ways scientists are only beginning to understand. Cedars-Sinai investigators are scouring this new frontier for ways to manage inflammatory bowel disease, such as tailored probiotics to help treat and manage the condition.
  • Triple-negative breast cancer is an especially aggressive form of cancer linked to the BRCA gene mutation. “Triple negative” means that it does not respond to the most sophisticated targeted therapies available. Investigators at Cedars-Sinai are identifying new potential targets for drugs that will result in more effective therapies and spare healthy tissue.
  • Kawasaki disease begins as a rash and a fever in an infant, and too often it results in adulthood heart problems. This condition is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children in the U.S. Investigators at Cedars-Sinai have discovered a drug that treats rheumatoid arthritis that also shows potential for preventing artery damage caused by the disease.
  • Cedars-Sinai investigators are exploring how to breach the blood-brain barrier in order to deliver chemotherapy treatment directly into brain tumors without the potential risk of injuring healthy cells.
  • Physicians may soon have the potential to restore vision in some patients. Scientists at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute are using a scaffold made of stem cells grafted on the cornea to repair abnormalities in the eye.